Creating a realistic hose load

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Creating a realistic hose load

Postby chariots of fire on Wed Aug 26, 2009 7:20 pm

Someone has asked about hose loads and in the past several questions have been asked of me regarding the hose loads I put in my apparatus models. So here is a short tutorial on what I have done.
There are two types of loads that I use.
1. Accordian load and
2. The flat load.
The accordian load is where the hose sections are vertical and next to one another.
The flat load is where each section lays flat and succeeding levels lay flat on top of them. Here are examples of each.
The first one is the flat load and is most often used for large diameter hose loads since it would come off the truck easier than other kinds. I used 3M yellow tape for the LDH on this model. It is 3/4" wide. I cut off a piece and laid it flat so that I could fold it in thirds. The hand lines on each side are made from 1/8" wide sewing elastic that you can find in any store such as Jo-Ann Fabrics, Wally World or Target.
Image
The second is an accordian lay and is a bit neater than the flat lay.
Image
The hose on this model is a section of shoelace and is way out of scale and it is not exactly an accordian lay; in fact would be called a horseshoe lay. It starts on one side, goes down that side of the body, across the back of the hose bed and around to the other side. Eventually each side fills in and meets in the middle. The last section out is wrapped around one side and is tucked in. It continues around the outside again but this time on top of the first layer. But you can see that with the accordian or horseshoe lays, the hose folds are vertical instead of horizontal. This model was one of my first attempts at serious scratch building and was done over 20 years ago. Today I would use sewing elastic for the hose and would stain it with thinned Floquil "earth" or "dust" paint to give it an older cotton jacket hose look.
I'll be taking some photos shortly and show how the loads are done and some shortcuts to help save on the amount of sewing elastic that is used. I'll also show you how you can add hose couplings to make the hose loads come alive.
Last edited by chariots of fire on Mon Oct 15, 2012 8:20 pm, edited 1 time in total.
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Re: Creating a realistic hose load

Postby cargostar on Wed Aug 26, 2009 9:58 pm

Can't wait!!!
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Re: Creating a realistic hose load

Postby rescue 74 on Thu Aug 27, 2009 12:02 pm

can't wait for more pictures and info thanks!!!
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Re: Creating a realistic hose load

Postby jimb on Thu Aug 27, 2009 1:04 pm

Good stuff! I like the couplers on you hard suction hoses, too. Your coulpers & nozzels look so real.
Jim

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Re: Creating a realistic hose load

Postby chariots of fire on Thu Aug 27, 2009 9:31 pm

Ok. We start with the materials necessary to make some hose and couplings. Sewing elastic in two flat sizes; 1/8" and 1/4" and some 1/16" round for forestry hose. You can get this material in any store that carries sewing items. And we need some brass and aluminum tubing. Then we need to get out the Floquil paint, some thinner and an old brush. Ah, yes the K&S tubing cutter, a round file and a flat file.
Image
The first thing in making couplings is to realize that there are the older style brass couplings and the newer pyrolite couplings. I use the brass tubing for the older cotton jacket hose and the aluminum for the newer dacron hose or the more modern single jacket stuff that you don't have to hang and dry before putting it back on the piece.
First mark off the tubing with two lines that are close together. You will cut around the tubing along these lines to simulate the connection of the male and female couplings. There is a third line which will be the one you will cut all the way through on. Incidently that is 4mm tubing I am using to simulate couplings for 3" supply lines.
Image
Next is to stain the elastic sections with some Floquil stain. Thin it out well so that it will run in the elastic. You don't want the stain to be too heavy. If you want it darker, just go over it again. Check both sides of the elastic to be sure that the stain covers the entire length.
Image
After you have stained the elastic you can add the couplings. If you want to simulate a coupling of two lengths of hose together just slip the section of tubing over the elastic and slide it to whatever length you want. Note that the elastic sticks out a bit away from the coupling. Real hose reacts this way also when it is folded or not charged.
Image
As you can see in the photo above you can "join" two lengths of similar hose or "join" two different types of hose just by sliding the tubing whereever you want it. To be really detailed I should have mated couplings of both brass and aluminum where the tan and white hose sections are connected. But you get the idea.
You can also simulate the uncoupled ends of the hose with a male or female coupling. All you need to do is cut off a shorter piece of tubing remembering that the swivel is still present on the female coupling and the threads protrude on the male coupling.
Image
This photo shows the ends of the hose but also shows a feature of this method of hose making that you just cannot avoid and that is that the hose is one-sided. When you lay the hose on the rig or in the bed you want to be sure and set with this side down so that you don't see that the elastic does not go all around the coupling. A little prodding or laying another section of hose near the coupling is generally sufficient to hide this defect.
The forestry hose is made in a similar manner but since it is round the flat side defect is not an issue. But you need to use smaller couplings to simulate forestry hose since it is only 1" to 1-1'4" diameter for the most part. Remember to try and keep things to scale.
Image
Now for the business end of things. Don Mills makes some nice quality white metal nozzles. Shown in the photo are two that come in the package; a pistol grip type nozzle and a standard nozzle. The pistol grip nozzle is as it comes in the package. The standard nozzle I have added a piece of aluminum tubing to for a coupling and have given it a black wash. Not only does it bring out the hilights, it makes the whole thing look just a bit more realistic.
I used a piece of 1/8" elastic for this one which would resemble a 1-1/2' handline.
Ok, Guys. It's your turn. I expect to see some hoseloads and nozzles on some of the rigs that are on the workbench! :D PS I'll do up a piece on how to load the hose and keep the amount of sewing elastic you have to use to a minimum.
Last edited by chariots of fire on Thu Aug 27, 2009 10:49 pm, edited 1 time in total.
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Re: Creating a realistic hose load

Postby bigdogb25 on Thu Aug 27, 2009 10:47 pm

Awesome tutorial Charlie - thanks for taking the time to put it together.

Do you use "fillers" for the rear hose bed like I've seen others do & read about or do you just fill up the bed with the simulated hose?
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Re: Creating a realistic hose load

Postby rescue 74 on Thu Aug 27, 2009 11:20 pm

AWESOME I like it!!!
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Re: Creating a realistic hose load

Postby chariots of fire on Fri Aug 28, 2009 7:27 am

No, I use fillers. It saves on material and is less tedious. That is the next part of the tutorial I will put together.
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Re: Creating a realistic hose load

Postby jimb on Fri Aug 28, 2009 8:25 am

Thank you for the tutorial. This is just what I needed!
Jim

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Re: Creating a realistic hose load

Postby hooknladderno1 on Fri Aug 28, 2009 10:28 am

Charlie,
Great Job! Although the materials/concept are not new to me, the way that you tied them all together, and the use of the Floquil Earth/Mud stains and marking the couplings on the tubing are fantastic. Thanks for sharing this! I look forward to the next installment. I will use these on my tanker project once I finish the helicopter. [b]Administrators, is it possible to "pin" this as it is a frequently asked and basic technique used in our hobby?[b]

David
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Re: Creating a realistic hose load

Postby ChrisMooney on Fri Aug 28, 2009 2:48 pm

Charlie I have used your trick and it works.. another way to Stain the Elastic is to Boil it with some Black Tea than let it dry for a day ore two.. This also works great
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Re: Creating a realistic hose load

Postby GLMFAA1 on Fri Aug 28, 2009 8:50 pm

Hip Hip Hurrah to Charlie, Nice Job
We are very fortunate to have Charlie here
Stars at night. You see them due to the light traveling from them. What you see is the stars past. If you are seeing a star that's 6,000 yrs ago. Imagine somebody on that star looking at us. They'd be seeing us as 6,000 yrs ago. Which of those two is now?
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Re: Creating a realistic hose load

Postby Pinolafire on Sat Aug 29, 2009 7:16 am

Someday my models will be nice enough to deserve a trick like this.. Thanks Charlie for sharing with us
Matt :mrgreen:
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Re: Creating a realistic hose load

Postby cargostar on Sat Aug 29, 2009 11:28 am

I know what I'm doing tonight!!!!
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Re: Creating a realistic hose load

Postby ward17219468 on Sat Aug 29, 2009 4:04 pm

Wow, that is pretty neat. Really makes a difference with that in the bed of the truck.
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Re: Creating a realistic hose load

Postby chariots of fire on Sat Aug 29, 2009 5:55 pm

Ok! Take you seats, everybody. Class is in session. Today we cover putting all that nice hose in the bed so we can put out some fire! For this demo I'm using a Monogram 1/32 scale Mack body mainly because it is handy and is one I had cut up for a different project anyway.
Begin by making a box that will fit the width of the hose bed but is shorter than the bed is high and also shorter than the bed is long. I used some Evergreen strip stock and some 0.030" sheet stock for this but the material is less important than the height and length.
Then cut some 1/8" elastic into pieces that will fit between the end of the box and the end of the hose body. Glue and fold them double so you end up with a fold that will show at the end of the bed. Use a clamp to make sure the hose is glued well and that the fold it tight.
Image
I have chosen to stain these pieces with Floquil "mud" to represent some cotton jacket 1-1/2" working lines. Make a bunch of these because you will need to fill the whole width of the bed in front of the box and even with the top of the box.
Image
Begin by running a bead of glue at the edge of the hose divider and the bed and lay in the first piece of hose. Make sure it sits tight to the divider and also sits flat. Lay up more pieces until you fill the bottom of the bed.
Image
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Continue with this very BORING process until you have filled the bed to the top of the box.
Image
Now it's time to begin laying in full length sections of elastic. Begin at the back of the bed and lay in the first piece. You can either fold the end over as I have done or leave it flat. Either way the first piece will be covered eventually. Run a bead of glue the whole length of the box and onto the first piece of short elastic all the way to the end. Lay the elastic down and hold it in place until the glue sets.
Image
Run some glue over the top of this last piece and fold the elastic back on itself even with the hose below it. Run it back to the rear of the hose body but switch it over to lie adjacent to the first length. This is how it would be done in reality. Hold this piece down until the glue sets and then fold it back on itself again, glueing it in place but this time run it to the second short piece of elastic and fold it back again.
Image
Image
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Now that you have the hang of it continue this process until you have covered the whole bed from one side to the other. Try and keep each length tight against the last one to cover the box but don't be concerned if it is not perfect. The next layer can take care of any gaps that you might see. I recommend at least 2 and preferably 3 layers on top of the box to hide it well. In the meantime you can add those couplings you made and tuck the hose in and around them to hide the fact that they are one sided. Add your nozzle or leave the end coupling showing; either way. Most times that last piece of hose does not end exactly at the edge of the body so you can fold it back or just lay it in the bed as I have done. Remember to make it look as if it was an actual hose load that was just packed in and is ready for the next run! Note the short section with the nozzle. I added a bit of black stain to make it look as it might after being used in a couple of good working fires. Believe me, they don't stay perfectly clean very long!
Image
This has been fun for me to do and I hope that you find it useful. Back in the station and off the air! ;)
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Re: Creating a realistic hose load

Postby cargostar on Sat Aug 29, 2009 6:26 pm

Three cheers for Charlie! Finally a detailed hose load!!!!
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Re: Creating a realistic hose load

Postby rescue 74 on Sat Aug 29, 2009 8:40 pm

NICE JOB YOU ROCK!!! I'm learning so much from you, keep them coming!!! you should do a Tutorial on "how to make a fire truck body with like opening doors" I want to do a fire truck but don't know where to start but great JOB 5 stars!!!
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Re: Creating a realistic hose load

Postby jimb on Mon Aug 31, 2009 11:50 am

Charlie, this tutorial is just what I needed. Thank you very much.

One question: if I'm doing an accordian lay, would I have a connector in the far right corner (where you started your top layer), or would the connector be hidden?

Thanks,
Jim

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Re: Creating a realistic hose load

Postby ChrisMooney on Mon Aug 31, 2009 8:17 pm

jimb wrote:Charlie, this tutorial is just what I needed. Thank you very much.

One question: if I'm doing an accordian lay, would I have a connector in the far right corner (where you started your top layer), or would the connector be hidden?

Thanks,


Right of left should be fine as long as the hose plays out from the top... also you must decide if you want a forward or reverse lay.... :)
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Re: Creating a realistic hose load

Postby chariots of fire on Mon Aug 31, 2009 8:42 pm

Sometimes the hose load gets split between a hydrant line and a working line. It depends on whether the female couplng is exposed or the male coupling is exposed. If you have a rear discharge you might want to connect the female coupling to it and then fold the hose into the bed. You could do that just be starting with a short piece from the discharge and work it into the corner just as you do those short folded pieces only you would just have the one piece. Then you would glue a folded piece up against it. The accordian lay would be done just like I showed for the flat lay; the difference being that the folds are vertical instead of horizontal. If you do split the load you would want a divider in the middle to keep the two loads separated.
A supply line would also have the female coupling at the rear of the bed but would be on top something like I showed in the last photo because that would be the first to come off the piece to be connected to the hydrant, either with a single gate valve or with a hydant assist valve.
On the engine I was assigned to we had just that arrangement with a hydrant bag on the rear step. The supply line had a Morse gate attached to it and was inside the bag. In the bag also was the hydant wrench and a couple of spanner wrenches. Whenever a supply line was needed the bag and hose came off the back and was right at the hydrant where it was needed. The line was then laid out from there. We had a small section of rope attached to the bag and a snap clip on the other end that we looped around a grab handle to keep the bag from falling off the truck. Details such as this are what separate a unique model from an ordinary one.
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Re: Creating a realistic hose load

Postby jimb on Mon Aug 31, 2009 8:57 pm

Wow! Thanks, Charlie.

The discharges on the back on the AMT ALF kit, they're too small for a 2-1/2", right? Better for a 1-1/2"?

This is all so confusing to a Probie!
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Re: Creating a realistic hose load

Postby Pinolafire on Wed Sep 02, 2009 9:20 am

Charlie,
Thanks for your knowledge... This is really cool and I can't hardly wait to get the this point on my builts to try this...

Matt :mrgreen:
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Re: Creating a realistic hose load

Postby Ford C Man on Wed Sep 02, 2009 6:55 pm

thanks for showing us to make a hose load charlie didn't firemodelman do one too ??
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Re: Creating a realistic hose load

Postby chariots of fire on Wed Sep 02, 2009 10:53 pm

jimb: The discharges on the rear of the ALF are too small for a 2-1/2". What you could do to enhance them a bit, though would be to drill a hole for a larger piece of tubing that would be more the size of a 3" piece of pipe, put a coupling on it and reduce it down to a 1-1/2" line and use the AMT cap. Check out the caps that Don Mills puts out also. They are nicely done and are chromed as well. They could be used for a hand line and in fact I have used plenty of them this way.
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