California Wild Fires

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California Wild Fires

Postby chariots of fire on Wed Dec 06, 2017 4:41 pm

This one is for Aaron and anybody else who wants to chime in. Wild Fires in California are nothing new and I can completely understand the Santa Ana winds, the mountainous terrain and the chapparel. I learned that back when I took a college course in forest fire control. But there is one thing I do not understand. And maybe it is just the snapshots of video you get to see on the news casts but some of the places where houses have been burnt to the ground just amaze me. There is nothing around them! I'm seeing nothing but bare ground.
I know that fire burns hottest going up a steep slope and there are plenty of those that I can see. With ultra dry conditions and low humidity, sparks can go a long way but it seems I am seeing a lot of destruction where there doesn't appear to be a real reason for it.
What am I missing, guys?
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Re: California Wild Fires

Postby mdlbldrmatt135 on Thu Dec 07, 2017 7:20 am

It might be as simple as building construction. Not using clay ties or metal for roofs, and stucco or cement board siding for exteriors.
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Re: California Wild Fires

Postby chariots of fire on Thu Dec 07, 2017 1:19 pm

Could be Matt. Wood roofs get dry just like the vegetation. I wouldn't build at the top of some of those hills. Just a disaster waiting to happen.
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Re: California Wild Fires

Postby GLMFAA1 on Thu Dec 07, 2017 7:30 pm

Charlie,
some of the pic I saw the roof tiles are all around the ash pile, I conjecture that the winds just kept everything hot like a blacksmith's billow in a forge. I hope every body stays safe and I have been listening by broadcastify site.

greg
Stars at night. You see them due to the light traveling from them. What you see is the stars past. If you are seeing a star that's 6,000 yrs ago. Imagine somebody on that star looking at us. They'd be seeing us as 6,000 yrs ago. Which of those two is now?
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Re: California Wild Fires

Postby chariots of fire on Thu Dec 07, 2017 10:23 pm

It sure is a mess. Guess you really have to be there to appreciate the extreme conditions. Prayers for everyone there; residents, firefighters and all.
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Re: California Wild Fires

Postby Aaronw on Fri Jan 05, 2018 1:34 am

Getting to this very late, but wind played a major role in the October fires in Northern California. The fire in Redwood Valley was only a few miles north of where I live and it wiped out a large part of the small community. I was on an assignment elsewhere and then on mandatory R&R days off at the peak of these fires. Winds were clocked at 80-100 miles per hour when these fires started, and they started fairly late in the evening which made evacuations more difficult, many people had gone to bed and had little or no time to escape fast moving fires.

Santa Rosa is south of me and is the fire that got the most attention because it burned in an urban area. It is also causing many experienced firefighters to wonder. In many areas the trees have survived where homes burnt to ash. It jumped 8 lanes of freeway and surface street in one of the areas hardest hit. I've never seen anything quite like it. It would appear this fire had more in common with old time urban conflagration (think Chicago Fire) than wildland fire. One of the neighborhoods hit hardest was an area I have been in many times, on flat ground with standard width residential streets and basically just ornamental vegetation. It did not look like anything most people would imagine when they hear wildland urban interface. I would guess it developed in the 1960s and 70s, lots of stucco, not wood.
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